Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Gabor Szabo - 1969

In the late '60s, many jazz artists were ignoring the rock and soul hits of the day -- when called upon to interpret popular songs, they stuck to their favorite Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin standards and didn't see Beatles or Marvin Gaye hits as vehicles for jazz improvisation. But there were some jazz artists who didn't feel that way; Grant Green, Herbie Mann, and Charles Earland -- just to give three examples -- saw no reason why rock and soul tunes couldn't receive instrumental jazz makeovers. And on 1969, Gabor Szabo puts a jazz spin on popular songs of the 1960s, including "Walk Away Renee" (a major hit for the Four Tops), the Beatles' "In My Life," and Joni Mitchell's "Both Sides Now." Again, there were many jazz artists who wouldn't have touched these songs in 1969 -- they would have insisted on providing yet another version of "Our Love Is Here to Stay" or "My Funny Valentine." But Szabo acknowledges that worthwhile popular music didn't die with George Gershwin. The Hungarian guitarist doesn't always stretch out as much as he could on this album; at times, he ends a solo that probably should have lasted a few more minutes. But Szabo still deserves credit for bringing a jazz perspective to songs that so many other improvisers were ignoring. Produced by Gary McFarland, this 1969 date originally came out on vinyl and was finally reissued on CD in 1998. - by Alex Henderson, AMG

Artist: Gabor Szabo
Album: 1969
Year: 1969 (Skye Records)
Label: DCC Jazz (1998)
Runtime: 34:19
Recorded at the United Recording Studios, Los Angeles, USA (January 20-23, 1969)

Tracks: 
1. Dear Prudence (John Lennon / Paul McCartney) 2:37
2.  Sealed With a Kiss (Gary Geld / Peter Udell) 2:41
3.  Both Sides Now (Joni Mitchell) 2:54
4.  Walk Away Renee (Michael Brown / Bob Calilli / Tony Sansone) 2:42
5.  You Won't See Me (John Lennon/Paul McCartney) 3:31
6.  Michael from Mountains (Gabor Szabo) 3:56
7.  Stormy (Buddy Buie / James Cobb) 3:12
8.  In My Life (John Lennon / Paul McCartney) 2:25
9.  I've Just Seen a Face (John Lennon / Paul McCartney) 4:30
10.  Until It's Time for You to Go (Buffie St. Marie) 2:18
11.  Somewhere I Belong (Gabor Szabo) 3:33

Personnel:
Gabor Szabo (Guitar)
Francois Vaz (Guitar)
Louis Kabok (Bass Guitar)
Randy Cierly (Fender Bass)
Mike Melvoin (Organ)
Jim Keltner (Drums and Percussion)
George Ricci (Cello)

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Eddie Harris - Instant Death

This is one of Eddie Harris's stronger Atlantic albums of the 1970s. Harris jamming on "Instant Death" is one of his most satisfying statements on the reed trumpet, guitarist Ronald Muldrow's "A Little Wes" is memorable and even the briefer pieces are worthwhile. In addition to Harris (who mostly plays his electrified tenor) and Muldrow, the group consists of keyboardist Richard Abrams, bassist Rufus Reid, drummer Billy James and percussionist Henry Gibson. This long out-of-print LP is long overdue to be reissued on CD. - by Scott Yanow, AMG

Artist: Eddie Harris
Album: Instant Death
Year: 1972 (Atlantic Recordings)
Label: Atlantic Masters (2004)
Runtime: 36:23

Tracks:
1.  Instant Death (Eddie Harris) 5:45
2.  A Little Wes (Ronald Muldrow) 7:30
3.  Zambezi Dance (Richard Abrams/Henry Gibson/Eddie Harris/Billy James/Ronald Muldrow) 4:09
4.  Summer's On Its Way (Eddie Harris) 7:46
5.  Nightcap (Eddie Harris) 5:08
6.  Superfluous (Eddie Harris) 3:18
7.  Tampion (Eddie Harris) 2:47

Personnel:
Eddie Harris (Saxophone [Electric Saxophone], Trumpet, Cowbell, Shaker, Voice [Horn Vocals], Effects)
Rufus Reid (Double Bass, Electric Bass)
Henry Gibson (Congas, Talking Drum)
Billy James (Drums, Kalimba)
Ronald Muldrow (Electric Guitar)
Muhal Richard Abrams (Electric Piano, Whistle [African Whistle])

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Frank Wess - Seven Classic Albums - IV

In a Minor Groovie:
With the exceptional flute sounds produced by Frank Wess, the combo plays music that is oriented via a unique sonic palate, further enhanced by the principals in the standards and originals they have chosen. Fellow Detroiter Herman Wright is here on bass, with duties split between legendary drummers Art Taylor and Roy Haynes, who place particular emphasis on subtle brushwork. Of course, the watchword of Ashby's sound is elegance, as she and Wess weave magical threads of gold and silver through standards like the circular and pristine "Moonlight in Vermont," the dramatic, slow "Yesterdays," or the sad "Alone Together." In a more Baroque or chamber setting, "Charmain" and "It's a Minor Thing" have Wess and Ashby thinking on a regal or Grecian platform. The variety on this collection is impressive, as you hear cinematic bluesy proclamations on "Autumn in Rome," striking mystery in "Taboo," mischievous and sly winks during "Rascallity," and a sexy calypso-to-swing beat as "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" unfolds. - by Michael G. Nastos, AMG

The Frank Wess Quartet:
Frank Wess has long been one of the most underrated flautists in jazz, but it's his primary instrument on this CD reissue of a Moodsville LP recorded in 1960. With fine accompaniment by piano master Tommy Flanagan, bassist Eddie Jones and drummer Bobby Donaldson, the leader's lyrical chops are evident in Alec Wilder's rarely performed ballad "It's So Peaceful in the Country." The light Latin setting of "Star Eyes" initially spotlights Flanagan's elegant piano, with the rhythm switching gears as Wess works his magic on flute. Flanagan alone introduces the dreamy interpretation of "But Beautiful," while Wess will melt any heart with his gorgeous flute solo. Wess is best known for his swinging tenor saxophone, heard on the richly textured "Gone With the Wind," a spacious "Stella by Starlight" (which will rival any saxophonist's recording for pure beauty), as well as his bluesy original "Rainy Afternoon," with Donaldson's light percussion possibly suggesting stepping in sidewalk puddles or windshield wipers clearing intermittent precipitation. Highly recommended. - by Ken Dryden, AMG

Artist: Frank Wess
Album: Seven Classic Albums IV.
Year: 1958, 1960 (New Jazz; Prestige)
Label: Real Gone Jazz (Digitally Remastered, 2013)
Runtime: 77:19

Tracks:
In a Minor Groovy
1.  Rascallity (Dorothy Ashby) 3:54
2.  You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To (Cole Porter) 3:59
3.  It's a Minor Thing (Dorothy Ashby) 3:56
4.  Yesterdays (Otto Harbach/Jerome Kern) 4:22
5.  Bohemia After Dark (Oscar Pettiford) 6:19
6.  Taboo (Margarita Lecuona) 6:15
7.  Autumn in Rome (Sammy Cahn/Paul Weston) 5:33
8.  Alone Together (Howard Dietz/Arthur Schwartz) 4:58
The Frank Wess Quartet
9. It's So Peaceful in the Country (Alec Wilder) - 4:01
10. Rainy Afternoon (Frank Wess) - 8:26
11. Star Eyes (Gene de Paul / Don Raye) - 3:54
12. Stella by Starlight (Ned Washington / Victor Young) - 5:10
13. But Beautiful (Johnny Burke / Jimmy Van Heusen) - 4:36
14. Gone with the Wind (Herb Magidson / Allie Wrubel) - 5:46
15. I See Your Face Before Me (Howard Dietz / Arthur Schwartz) - 6:05

Personnel:
Frank Wess (Flute, Tenor Saxophone)
Dorothy Ashby (Harp) 1-8
Herman Wright (Double Bass) 1-8
Roy Haynes (Drums) 1-8
Tommy Flanagan (Piano) 9-15
Eddie Jones (Double Bass) 9-15
Bobby Donaldson (drums) 9-15

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Frank Wess - Seven Classic Albums - III

After Hours:
A leaderless sextet jams on four of pianist Mal Waldron's originals. The performances range from eight to 12 minutes apiece. The all-star lineup -- trumpeter Thad Jones, Frank Wess on tenor and flute, guitarist Kenny Burrell, Waldron, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Art Taylor -- is in fine form on the straight-ahead material. Bop fans will want to pick this up. - by Scott Yanow, AMG

Wheelin' and Dealin':
This two-fer from the excellent Prestige series of two-LP sets features Coltrane at a pair of jam-session-type settings in 1957. He is heard along with fellow tenor Paul Quinichette and Frank Wess on flute and tenor on two long versions apiece of "Wheelin'" and "Dealin" in addition to a fine rendition of "Things Ain't What They Used to Be" and a 15-minute version of "Robbins' Nest." In addition, there are two numbers from a sextet session with trumpeter Bill Hardman and altoist Jackie McLean. Overall the music is not all that essential (since there are so many other Coltrane recordings available) but is quite enjoyable on its own terms and worth picking up. - by Scott Yanow, AMG

Recorded days after the wonderful Blue Train album, this session brought together an unusual cast of players. John Coltrane, Paul Quinichette and Frank Wess on tenor saxophone (with Wess doubling on flute), Mal Waldron running the show on piano, Doug Watkins on bass and Art Taylor on drums. Probably the most interesting material on this album is the take of Waldron's "Wheelin'", a fast romp which provides a battleground for a three-way tenor tussle. Waldron takes an extended solo in his Monk-like awkward but bluesy style, which either does it for you or doesn't. It's a shame this was released under Coltrane's/Wess' name since it's really Mal Waldron's set and material and probably not in the taste of most Trane lovers, but still worth checking out. - Amazon.com

Artist: Frank Wess
Album: Seven Classic Albums (Disc 3)
Year: 1957-58 (Prestige Records)
Label: Real Gone Jazz (Digitally Remastered, 2013)
Runtime: 65:13

Tracks:
After Hours:
Count One (Mal Waldron) 7:53
Empty Street (Mal Waldron) 12:38
Wheelin and Dealin':
3.  Things Ain't What They Used to Be (Mercer Ellington / Ted Persons) 8:25
4.  Wheelin' (Mal Waldron) 11:22
5.  Robbin's Nest (Illinois Jacquet / Bob Russell / Sir Charles Thompson) 15:30
6.  Dealin' (Mal Waldron) 10:13

Personnel:
Frank Wess (Tenor Saxophone, Flute, Alto Saxophone)
Mal Waldron (Piano)
Art Taylor (Drums)
John Coltrane (Tenor Saxophone) 3-6
Paul Quinichette (Tenor Saxophone) 3-6
Doug Watkins (Double Bass) 3-6
Kenny Burrell (Guitar) 1-2
Thad Jones (Trumpet) - 1-2
Paul Chambers (Double Bass) 1-2

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Frank Wess - Seven Classic Albums II.

Monday Stroll:
Although the original LP was reissued under guitarist Kenny Burrell's name, it was originally led by Frank Wess, who is heard doubling on flute and tenor. With the assistance of Burrell, rhythm guitarist Freddie Green, bassist Eddie Jones and either Kenny Clarke or Gus Johnson on drums, Wess is in excellent form on a set very reminiscent (not too surprisingly considering the personnel) of the Count Basie band. Wess contributed four of the songs, Burrell brought in "Southern Exposure" and the quintet also plays "Over the Rainbow" and the obscure "Woolafunt's Lament." This is a fine straightahead date, with Wess's flute taking solo honors. - by Scott Yanow, AMG

Just as Kenny Burrell began his highly prolific career recording for Blue Note and the Prestige label in 1957, he managed to put out this successful and basic model of light, gentle swinging as he teamed up with multi reeds virtuoso Frank Wess to create this special, breezy stroke of camaraderie. What would become his only solo album for the Savoy label, Monday Stroll would highly showcase a nice blend of flute and guitar artistry backed with a rhythm section providing the chirpy support that made it a refreshing success as the quintet play with fluidity where Wess doubles on flute and the occasional tenor saxophone while master drummer Kenny Clarke and a local Detroit bassist gradually sits in rather well in unique style. Featuring mostly great original compositions penned by Wess and Burrell, the music gets off on a straight “up” tone on the title track as it proceeds with merriment on other extended numbers like Wess’ relaxed ballad East Wind, West Side, Southern Exposure, the standard classic Over The Rainbow, as well as the final track Kansas City Style. Although Monday Stroll was released under Burrell’s name, it was headed by Wess for whom he got equal billing—he would even play tenor saxophone on Woolafunt’s Holiday, where Burrell demonstrates the mutually intuitive responsiveness that he and Wess had). Also added to the chemistry are guitarist Freddie Green on rhythm guitar and fellow session drummer is featured on two tracks, as this band bring us the mellow magic that made an instant success, which will maintain it’s high point with unforgettable results. - by RH, Amazon.com

After Hours:
A leaderless sextet jams on four of pianist Mal Waldron's originals. The performances range from eight to 12 minutes apiece. The all-star lineup -- trumpeter Thad Jones, Frank Wess on tenor and flute, guitarist Kenny Burrell, Waldron, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Art Taylor -- is in fine form on the straight-ahead material. Bop fans will want to pick this up. - by Scott Yanow, AMG

Artist: Frank Wess
Album: Seven Classic Albums (Disc 2)
Year: 1956-1957 (Savoy Records, Prestige Records)
Label: Real Gone Jazz (Digitally Remastered, 2013)
Runtime: 63:57

Tracks:
Monday Stroll (1957)
1.  Monday Stroll (Frank Wess) 4:22
2.  East Wind (Kenny Burrell) 5:14
3.  Wess Side (Frank Wess) 5:02
4.  Southern Exposure (Kenny Burrell) 6:50
5.  Woolafunts Lament (Frank Wess) 7:06
6.  Over the Rainbow (Harold Arlen / E.Y. "Yip" Harburg) 6:01
7.  Kansas City Life (Frank Wess) 8:31
After Hours (1957)
1.  Steamin' (Mal Waldron) 9:28
2.  Blue Jelly (Mal Waldron) 11:26

Personnel:
Frank Wess (Tenor Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Flute)
Kenny Burrell (Guitar)
Eddie Jones (Double Bass) - 1-7
Freddie Green (Rhythm Guitar) - 1-7
Gus Johnson (Drums) - 1,5
Kenny Clarke (Drums) - 2-4,6,7
Mal Waldron (Piano) - 8-9
Thad Jones (Trumpet) - 8-9
Paul Chambers (Double Bass) - 8-9
Art Taylor (Drums) - 8-9

Monday, September 11, 2017

Frank Wess - Seven Classic Albums I.

Jazz for Playboys:
This CD reissue has three songs apiece from two similar sessions. One half of the set features Frank Wess (doubling on flute and tenor) accompanied by both Kenny Burrell and Freddy Green on guitars, bassist Eddie Jones and drummer Gus Johnson; the other three titles add trumpeter Joe Newman and have Ed Thigpen in Johnson's place. The music is essentially cool-toned swing/bop very much in a Count Basie vein and is easily recommended to straightahead jazz fans despite the so-so packaging and LP-length playing time.- by Scott Yanow, AMG

Trombones & Flute:
One of my favorite small-group jazz albums of the mid-1950s is Frank Wess's Trombones & Flute. The album, recorded for Savoy in July 1956, paired Wess on flute with four trombonists—Jimmy Cleveland, Henry Coker, Benny Powell and Bill Hughes. They were backed by Ronnell Bright (p), Freddie Green (g), Eddie Jones (b) and Kenny Clarke (d). The swinging, lyrical arrangements were by Frank Foster.At the time, Wess, Foster, Coker, Powell, Hughes, Green and Jones were all members of Count Basie's New Testament band while Ronnell Bright would periodically sub for Basie into the 1980s. In 1956, to hold his band together at the dawn of the 12-inch LP era, Basie let his musicians make extra money recording as leaders during the band's down time. What we hear on this album is Foster setting Wess aloft on flute while unrolling a thick rubbery trombone cushion underneath. In effect, these are Basie arrangements in miniature. Two of the songs are Foster originals—Lo-Fi and You'll Do—while Wanting You and Don't Blame Me are standards, and Crackerjack is by Coker. The creative album was conceived and produced by Ozzie Cadena (above) and recorded at Rudy Van Gelder's studio in Hackensack, N.J., which happened to be his parents' house. Wess was one of the first musicians to play jazz flute, and his sense of swing on the instrument here is intoxicating. The addition of Green was a nice touch, since he not only adds dimensional time-keeping but also a Basie flavor. What's more, we get to hear sensational trombones as a section and as individual soloists.
And Ronnell is flawless as an accompanist and soloist—providing tasteful chords and provocative punctuation. - Jazz.FM

Artist: Frank Wess
Album: Seven Classic Albums (Disc 1)
Year: 1956-1957 (Savoy Records)
Label: Real Gone Jazz (Digitally Remastered, 2013)
Runtime: 67:02

Tracks:
Jazz for Playboys (1957)
1.  Playboy (Ernie Wilkins) 5:27
2.  Miss Blues (Joe Newman) 9:40
3.  Baubles, Bangles and Beads (George Forrest / Robert Wright) 4:16
4.  Low Life (Johnny Mandel) 5:02
5.  Pin Up (Frank Wess) 4:07
6.  Blues For A Playmate (Kenny Burrell) 11:00
Trombones & Flute (1956)
7.  Lo-Fi (Frank Foster) 9:14
8.  Wanting You (Oscar Hammerstein II / Sigmund Romberg) 4:28
9.  Don't Blame Me (Dorothy Fields / Jimmy McHugh) 3:23
10.  Cracker Jack (Henry Coker) 9:59
11.  You'll Do (Frank Foster) 5:23

Personnel:
Frank Wess (Tenor Saxophone, Flute)
Eddie Jones (Double Bass)
Freddie Green (Rhythm Guitar, Guitar)
Kenny Burrell (Guitar) - 1-6
Joe Newman (Trumpet) - 1,2,4
Ed Thigpen (Drums) - 1,2,4
Gus Johnson (Drums) - 3,5,6
Kenny Clarke (Drums) - 7-11
Ronnell Bright (Piano) - 7-11
Benny Powell (Trombone) - 7-11
Bill Hughes (Trombone) - 7-11
Henry Coker (Trombone) - 7-11
Jimmy Cleveland (Trombone) - 7-11

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Lonnie Liston Smith - Cosmic Funk

This one is packed with classic tracks and is probably Smith's best record of them all. He wasn't quite discoed-out yet and he was fresh off of his traditional jazz runnings, so this record hits a very comfortable middle ground for fusion heads as well as those more tuned into smooth jazz. An incredible record that doesn't get anywhere near enough props as it should for helping define the fusion movement of the early 70s. - by Scott Woods, Amazon.com

As Dean Rudland points out in Ace's 2014 reissue of Lonnie Liston Smith's 1974 set Cosmic Funk, Smith himself views this LP as a transitional effort, capturing him between his pioneering work with Miles Davis' electric group and the exploratory Expansions. This suggests it perhaps isn't a cohesive album and, true enough, it's a record where the good ideas are sometimes suggested rather than developed. Much of the record showcases the smooth vocal stylings of Smith's brother Donald, who leads on a vocal version of John Coltrane's "Naima," lends a bit of a supper club vibe to "Beautiful Woman," croons through "Peaceful Ones," and dives into the thick, overlapping grooves of the title track. That opening song is one of the few tracks that emphasizes funk, otherwise the cosmic reigns, as the group usually getting spacy all the while never quite leaving the earth. Although the group is quite lively on a relatively straight-ahead reading of Wayne Shorter's "Footprints," the album is distinguished by the spaces that lie between funk and bop, the periods where Smith and company start to float, then pull themselves back. - by Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AMG

Artist: Lonnie Liston Smith & The Cosmic Echoes
Album: Cosmic Funk
Year: 1974 (Flying Dutchman Records)
Label: RCA Viktor (1993)
Runtime: 36:09
Recorded at the RCA Recording Studios, New York in April, 1974.

Tracks:
1.  Cosmic Funk (Lonnie Liston Smith) 5:39
2.  Footprints (Wayne Shorter) 6:11
3.  Beautiful Woman (Lonnie Liston Smith) 6:58
4.  Sais (Egypt) (James Mtume) 8:16
5.  Peaceful Ones (Lonnie Liston Smith) 5:03
6.  Naima (John Coltrane) 4:00

Personnel:
Lonnie Liston Smith (Acoustic and Elelctric Piano, Percussion)
Donald Smith (Vocals, Piano and Flute)
George Barron (Soprano Saxophone, Flute and Percussion)
Al Anderson (Electric Bass)
Lawrence Killian (Congas and Percussion)
Art Gore (Drums)
Doug Hammond (Percussion)

Monday, August 21, 2017

Mode Plagal - Mode Plagal II

Ebullient originality and improvisational skill describe the audibly provocative new CD by Greek jazz band, Mode Plagal. "Mode Plagal II" is the long-awaited follow-up to the group's 1995 album "Mode Plagal", on the alternative Ano Kato Records label. Full of inventive touces, this just-out album gives the listener a taste of jazz as seen through the eyes -and ears- of innovative Greek musicians. Ladies and gentlemen, meet Mode Plagal: Thodoris Rellos on alto saxophone, Kleon
Antoniou on electric guitar, Antonis Maratos on electric bass, Takis Kanellos on drums and Angelos Polychroniou on percussion. These skilled musicians dared to "jazzify" Greek traditional music (demotika) and the outcome is indeed impressive. Conventional ingredients of the demotika have been enhanced with thick icings of jazz harmonies and distinctive bass lines. They have resourcefully taken a marginalised music and literally given it a new lease of life. And these audacious improvisers don't hide their influences either, instead, they put them on centre stage transforming these blatant borrowings into a newly emerging musical style that has the melodic appeal of fine jazz and the weightier rhythmic line of the Greek demotika tradition. By skillfully manipulating the musical time of a traditional tune from western Macedonia they come up with "Funky Vergina", an attractive example of jazz improv with sax, bass and drum solos intact. The best thing about this CD is that these guys bring conviction to what they do, and the penetrating clarity of their individual performances bears that out. Those who attended last week's performance at the Megaron know that all too well. With a set of personal modes and a radical approach, Mode Plagal have created a style that absorbs tradition, making it an integral part of their music without delivering pale imitations. Particulary delicious is the wonderfully arranges ethnic-tinged "Kalanta" - Christmas carols from Thrace - bolstered by shouting percussion and feather-light saxophone fillings. But if sustained intensity is what you're after, look no further than the stylistically diverse "Pikrodafni (...a blues)" which draws from the Epirot rhythmic heritage. This potent six-minute-plus track, featuring a dynamic sax lead and a driving drum beat, is exhilarating. There's also the more atmospheric "Salona", from Roumeli (continental Greece) where a sonorous sax solo takes the listener to the plains of the region, and the bluesy guitar riffs to Chicago's moody blues joints. What makes this CD, released on Lyra, well worth exploring? It's fresh, well-crafted and finally downright radical. Demotika ill never sound the same after Mode Plagal II. The band has pushed contemporary Greek music into new territories. As for Mode Plagal, keep your eyes and ears open, these guys are probably somewhere in town doing their gig... by Maria Paravantes, Athens News

Artist: Mode Plagal
Album: Mode Plagal II
Year: 1998
Label: Lyra Records
Runtime: 68:15
Recorded in Athens, Greece

Tracks:
1.  Funky Vergina (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 5:48
2.  Miles' Leventikos (Mimis Doutsoulis/Thodoris Rellos) 7:00
3.  The Letter (Thodoris Rellos) 9:31
4.  Carols (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 6:10
5.  Ulysses (Thodoris Rellos/Kleon Antoniou/Antonis Maratos/Takis Kanellos) 1:26
6.  Kalamatianos (Folk Dance/arr. Mode Plagal) 4:31
7.  Pikrodafni (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 6:36
8.  Helios (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 3:52
9.  Cyclops (Thodoris Rellos/Kleon Antoniou/Antonis Maratos/Takis Kanellos) 0:18
10.  Rock Around Eleven (Thodoris Rellos) 3:44
11.  Ivo (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 5:05
12.  Solo Sax (Thodoris Rellos) 2:27
13.  Salona (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 4:15
14.  Solo Drums (Takis Kanellos) 1:06
15.  On Foreign Lands (Traditional/arr. Mode Plagal) 4:42
16.  Blazing Sun (Thodoris Rellos/Kleon Antoniou/Antonis Maratos/Takis Kanellos) 1:44

Personnel:
Thodoris Rellos (Alto Saxophone and Vocals)
Kleon Antoniou (Electric Guitar and Vocals)
Antonis Maratos (Bass Guitar and Vocals)
Takis Kanellos (Drums and Vocals)
Angelos Polychroniou (Congas and Tambourine) - 1-4,7,10,11,15
Maria Aristopoulou (Vocals) - 7
Sophia Papazoglou (Vocals) - 7
Vassilis Hadjinikolaou (Vocals) - 7

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